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New Intel Design and Packaging Innovations Reduce Silicon Footprint by More Than 50%, Enable Real Time Power Sharing Across CPU and GPU for Optimal Performance

New Intel Core Processor Combines High-Performance CPU with Custom Discrete Graphics from AMD to Enable Sleeker, Thinner Devices

By Christopher Walker

We frequently speak about our focus on driving innovation to the enthusiast community, a concentrated but growing part of the PC marketplace. Each product line delivers a variety of new capacities, workloads and form aspects to cater to the varied needs of fans.

However, as we looked at this lineup we realized a chance: skinnier, lighter, more effective enthusiast mobile platforms that provide a superior experience. Presently, most enthusiast cellular PCs have Intel Core H-series chips plus higher-powered different graphics1, leading to systems that typical 26 millimeters in height.

We wanted to locate a way. A means to deliver a more powerful mix of performance-level chips and different graphics that open the doorway to smaller form factors.

Nowadays, we’re sharing first details on a brand new product which does precisely that, reducing the regular silicon footprint to less than half an regular discrete components on a motherboard. That is more liberty for OEMs to be creative and provide advanced thin and light designs with enhanced thermal dissipation. In addition, it provides space to incorporate new attributes, produce new board designs, explore new heating options or boost battery life.

The new solution, which is a part of our 8th Gen Intel Core household, brings along our high-performing Intel Core H-series chip, second creation High Definition Memory (HBM2) plus a custom-to-Intel third party discrete graphics chip from AMD’s Radeon Technologies Group* — everything in one chip package.

It is a prime example of hardware and software inventions intersecting to make something amazing that matches a special marketplace difference. Attempting to deliver on our vision for this category of merchandise, we worked together with the group in AMD’s Radeon Technologies Group. In close cooperation, we made a fresh semi-custom graphics processor, so that is also a fantastic illustration of how we could compete and operate together, finally delivering innovation that’s very good for customers.

“Collectively we’re offering players and content creators the chance to have a thinner-and-lighter PC capable of providing different performance-tier graphics adventures in AAA matches and content creation software. This fresh semi-custom GPU sets the operation and capacities of Radeon images into the control of an enlarged set of fans who need the very best visual experience possible.”

In the center of the new layout is EMIB, a tiny smart bridge which enables heterogeneous silicon to rapidly pass data in very near proximity. EMIB eliminates height effect in addition to design and manufacturing complexities, allowing quicker, stronger and more effective products in smaller dimensions. Here is.

We have added exceptional applications drivers and interfaces for the semi-custom discrete GPU that organize information among all 3 components of this system. Not only does this help handle equilibrium, electricity delivery and performance condition in real time, but in addition, it enables system developers to correct the proportion of energy sharing between the chip and graphics based on workloads and usages, such as performance gambling. Balancing energy between our high-performing chip and the graphics subsystem is vital to accomplish good performance across both chips as systems make thinner.

Intel introduces a new product in the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family that combines high-performance CPU with discrete graphics for a thin, sleek designIntel introduces a new product in the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family that combines high-performance CPU with discrete graphics for a thin, sleek design. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Intel introduces a new product in the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family that combines a high-performance CPU with discrete graphics and HBM2 for a thin, sleek design. A comparison shows the space these components take on a traditional board (left) and on the new 8th Gen Intel Core processor that combines the components all on one package.
Intel introduces a new product in the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family that combines a high-performance CPU with discrete graphics and HBM2 for a thin, sleek design. A comparison shows the space these components take on a traditional board (left) and on the new 8th Gen Intel Core processor that combines the components all on one package. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Additionally, this solution is the first mobile PC to use HBM2, which consumes much less power and takes up less space compared to traditional discrete graphics-based designs using dedicated graphics memory, like GDDR5 memory.

This new addition to the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family builds on our strong portfolio of mobile and graphics solutions. Our 8th Gen and 7th Gen Intel Core processors brought capabilities like brilliant 4K content creation and consumption in amazing new designs. And as the leading supplier of PC Graphics, media and display technologies2, we deliver the visual experience to the majority of computers with our Intel HD and UHD graphics. Now, we’re opening the door for thinner, lighter devices across notebooks, 2 in 1s and mini desktops, while delivering incredible performance and graphics for enthusiasts.

Some might say the PC market is mature and has been for some time. At Intel, we challenge that notion every day. We are always creating new possibilities people haven’t seen or experienced. Look for more to come in the first quarter of 2018, including systems from major OEMs based on this exciting new technology.

Chris Walker is vice president of the Client Computing Group and general manager of the Mobile Client Platform at Intel Corporation.

11H’17 GFK Retail Notebook Sales out data/1H’17 NPD Retail Notebook Sell Through data

2Mercury Research, PC Graphics Report, Q3 2017

Source: Intel Newsroom